I took a few photos of posters publicizing lectures to be held at USTC. As you'll see below, it's not much easier to  understand the English any more than understanding the Chinese characters. Now, I don't know if this is a matter of Chinglish, bad translation or just my woeful ignorance about science and all things quantum. Judge for yourself.
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As you can see from this schedule, though, science is not all work and no play. There's still plenty of time for tea and a two-hour lunch that allows time for the sacrosanct 'rest.'
 
 
I've spent much of the past four years untangling Chinglish, that mix of English and Chinese languages that's almost like English, but just misses the hoop. (I wrote a column about Chinglish here.) I thought I'd give you a meaty taste of some unadulerated Chinglish. The following is part of an unedited posting for USTC's website about my now-legendary lecture about U.S. logistics. It requires no comment. Enjoy.

"Combined his own experience, Professor Wyatt Olson briefed the American passenger transportation's historical development situation and present's development direction for students of particular interest to the U.S. case of highway passenger transportation. He also highlighted that the U.S. highway construction several advantages that should be learned from. Finally, Professor Wyatt Olson summarized the US traffic control to base on two foundations: hardware foundation (developed highway and advanced traffic equipment) and software foundation (people-oriented management principle)."